Donald O. Pederson
1995 Phil Kaufman Award Recipient

SAN JOSE, Calif.–November 17, 1995–The Electronic Design Automation Companies (EDAC) today announced the winner of its 1995 Phil Kaufman Award. Donald O. Pederson was selected by EDAC as the 1995 recipient. The award honors him for his innovative contributions to design tool technology of benefit to electronic systems and IC designers.

The Phil Kaufman Award, was presented November 16, 1995 at the organization’s Executive Forum at the Stanford Park Hotel in Menlo Park, CA.

According to Dr. Walden (Wally) C. Rhines, president and CEO of Mentor Graphics, EDAC’s vice-chairman and the Phil Kaufman Award Nominating Committee chairman, “EDAC’s Phil Kaufman Award honors those who have made significant contributions to design tool technology. Donald O. Pederson is one of these innovators. This Award honors his pioneering work in circuit simulation and his contributions to the development of SPICE.”

Richard Newton, a member of EDAC’s Phil Kaufman Award Nominating committee said about the 1995 Phil Kaufman winner, “Pederson’s engineering contributions are unique in the way in which algorithms and ideas combined, and the way he and his students established and maintained relationships with industry for the continued evolution of the programs. He has worked with many talented people throughout his career, but he has been the common denominator in much of their successful work.”

Bryan Preas, principal scientist at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center and the nominator of the 1995 Phil Kaufman award winner, noted, “Pederson’s early work in circuit simulation is best measured by the use of the technology he andhis colleagues developed over the last quarter century. Virtually every semiconductor company and the vast majority of EDA companies throughout the world use a version of SPICE, or a program derived directly from it. Over the past twenty years, over one dozen companies have been formed based around SPICE versions. In almost every case, the basic architecture of the program, as originally designed by Pederson and his colleagues, is still used and, in most cases, virtually all the original code in still present.”

Preas, added, “Just as important as his contributions to SPICE and circuit simulation is the fact that Pederson was the first significant industry catalyst for EDA for integrated circuits. His engineering contributions to the electronics industry were not only reduced to practice, but represent the most effective model we have seen for how such innovations can be transferred from universities to industry.”

Donald O. Pederson Biography:
Donald O. Pederson received the B.S. degree from North Dakota State University in 1948, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University in 1949 and 1951. He was awarded in 1979 an honorary Doctor of Applied Science by the Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium.

From 1951-1953 he was with the Electronics Research Laboratory, Stanford University and from 1953-1955 with the Bell http://www.buyambienmed.com Telephone http://premier-pharmacy.com Laboratories, Inc. In 1955 he joined the University of California, Berkeley. He is now Professor Emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences. From 1988-1991, he was the inaugural E.L. and H.H. Buttner Professor of Electrical Engineering. From 1983-1985 he was Chairman of the Department. From 1960-1964 he was Director of the Electronics Research Laboratory. In 1991, he received The University of California’s Berkeley Citation. In 1995, he was elected a Berkeley Fellow.

He is a member of the Board of Directors of Varian Associates, Inc.

About the Phil Kaufman Award:
The EDA Consortium Phil Kaufman Award is named in honor of EDA industry pioneer Phil Kaufman, who turned innovative technologies like silicon compilation and emulation into businesses that have greatly benefited electronic designers. Previous award winners are Carver Mead, Gordon and Betty Moore Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at the California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, CA); Don Pederson, Professor Emeritus, University of California (Berkeley, CA); and Herman Gummel of Bell Labs (Murray Hill, NJ).

About the EDA Consortium
The EDA Consortium (now the ESD Alliance) is an international association of companies engaged in the development, manufacture and sale of design tools and services to the electronic engineering community. The EDA industry provides the critical technology, software products and services to design the electronics that enable the Information Age. EDA products drive the latest developments in the computer, communications, and consumer electronics, medical and industrial equipment, and military and aerospace industries.

For more information about the Phil Kaufman Award, contact: ESD Alliance, 541 Jefferson Ave., Redwood City, CA 94063. Phone: 408-287-3322, or visit esd-alliance.org.
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Notes
The information supplied by the EDA Consortium is believed to be accurate and reliable, and the Consortium assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document. All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

About Phil Kaufman
Phil Kaufman died July 17, 1992 during a business trip in Japan. He spent more than a quarter-of-a-century in the computer industry and was an active EDA Consortium member. His experience encompassed hardware, software, semiconductors, EDA and computer architecture. He was CEO of Quickturn Systems, now known as Quickturn Design Systems and a part of Cadence, and accelerated the use of emulation, a new design automation technology for fast IC development. In addition Mr. Kaufman was chairman and president of Silicon Compiler Systems where he was instrumental in advancing the concept of silicon compilation.

Prior to joining the EDA industry Mr. Kaufman was a manager in Intel’s microprocessor component group. He was the driving force behind the IEEE Ethernet Standard, and was instrumental in developing the IEEE Floating-Point Standard. He earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Michigan, he held several patents and began his career in EDA at Computer Automation, Inc.